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correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
that the gradually improving relations between pakistan and india are not given a dent from this attack? >> i think the indian government is being very cautious. i think they are not speculating and i think so it would be very early for me to speculate on why they decided to be very open-minded about this investigation. of course the 2008 attacks on mumbai, the indian government did accuse pakistan of having some involvement in this those attacks. the 2006 train bombings in the city happened in the rush hour, more than a dozen indian nationals arrested for that. it is very easy to -- there has been a lot of speculation and jumping to conclusions about the possibility of pakistan's involvement but the indian government is keeping an open mind. pakistan governments condemned the attacks shortly after they happened yesterday. indian opposition parties are pointing a finger in that direction but i think it is very early to draw any speculation about who might be behind this attack, particularly because they say they are still working on very limited intelligence. >> thank you very much indeed. the chin
pakistan. -- she went on to vow that the obama administration will not ease pressure on neighboring pakistan. >> this used to be rare. now they are routine. both countries are determined to strengthen their strategic global partnership, defense and regional security or on the agenda. the agreed to work closer together in afghanistan as the u.s. agreed to pull out its troops. hillary clinton praised the recent resumption of talks between india and pakistan. >> we think this is the most promising approach to encourage both sides to build more confidence between them and work to implement the kinds of steps that will demonstrate the improved atmosphere that is so necessary for us to deal with the underlying problem of terrorism. >> she also said that terrorism was on everyone's minds following last week's bombing of mumbai which killed 20 people. the attack revealed once again the vulnerability of the indian cities and the police who are investigating. the security agencies should work closer together to prevent future attacks. the focus of the next page of the visit will be on busines
to sell my calves earlier than i used to. last week, i sold half of my cows. >> whether u.s. pakistan relations can ever recover. >> anyone who has stepped back from the abyss after looking into it realizes that once again we have very important objectives. >> it is a year until the british show on earth comes to london, will the city be ready? on a live picture to remember. there is nothing new about political gridlock in washington. republicans and democrats have fallen out over something that normally passes on a nod, raising the debt ceiling. out in the real america, there is a great deal of pain over the economy. our correspondent has been taking the route over oklahoma which inspired the john steinbeck novel "the grapes of wrath." >> to the red country and part of the great country to open, -- to oklahoma. the last rains cut gently. >> so begins steinbeck's novel "the grapes of wrath." the events that happened or 80 years ago, but once again america is in the grip of unemployment and oklahoma is in the grip of drought. i'm about to retrace the journey that steinbeck describes. a
to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are accusing pakistan of doing. certainly the pakistanis feel very much under pressure. they do need the dollars, but not to the extent that we might think, because they do get a large proportion -- the pakistani army gets a large proportion of the domestic budget here, but it is the humiliation more than anything that will help the pakistani army. and yes, the two sides do need each other. nobody's talking about breaking up completely, but it's whether this will have the desired effect that washington wants or not, and that is something we simply can't tell right now. >> aleem maqbool. in syria, supporters of the government and so
warned there would be harsh punishment for anyone found guilty of negligence in the sinking. in pakistan, intelligence officials reported u.s. drone aircraft, firing missiles, killed at least 42 suspected militants in less than 24 hours. four missile strikes targeted sites in tribal areas near the afghan border, beginning late monday night. u.s. and pakistani relations have been increasingly tense since the raid that killed osama bin laden. a u.s. army ranger was awarded the nation's highest military award, the medal of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any se
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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